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Rev. William Winterbotham

Rev. William Winterbotham Additional Information on Winterbotham,  Rev. William - I14071

Male 1763 - 1829  (Age: 65)    Has 4 ancestors and 300 descendants in our family tree.


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  • Name William Winterbotham 
    Prefix Rev. 
    Born 15 Dec 1763  Aldgate, London, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Address :  
    Mansfield Street off Rosemary Lane, Little Minories 
    Christened 25 Dec 1763  Whitechapel, London, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Address :  
    St Mary 
    • Address at the time, recorded as Mansfield Street but could be Mansell or Mansel Street.
    Christening Record: WINTERBOTHAM, William 17631225
    Christening Record: WINTERBOTHAM, William 17631225
    Gender Male 
    Christening 1789 
    Criminal Charges 26 Jul 1793  Exeter, Devonshire, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Address :  
    Exeter Assizes 
    • William was a Baptist Minister at Plymouth, in Devonshire. He was fined £200.00 and imprisoned for four years after being found guilty of preaching a sermon "advocating an extension of civil and religious liberty". In addition to his prison sentence, William was also bound over to be of good character for a further 5 years after his release. Initially imprisoned in Clerkenwell prison, after a short period, William was was transferred to Newgate prison where, it is said that anything aside from freedom itself, could be bought. William enjoyed the company of intellectuals in Newgate and shared an appartment there with 3 others for which he paid 8 shillings per week!
    Obverse and reverse of a copper halfpenny token manufactured in the names of Henry Symonds, William Winterbotham, James Ridgway and David Holt, 1794. [Note: Earlier - and much rarer examples, show the Newgate gaol image with a flat roof]
    Obverse and reverse of a copper halfpenny token manufactured in the names of Henry Symonds, William Winterbotham, James Ridgway and David Holt, 1794. [Note: Earlier - and much rarer examples, show the Newgate gaol image with a flat roof]
    Trials for sedition in late-eighteenth-century England were not uncommon, and the country could in no way be considered a safe place to speak out against government (or indeed, the Church). Those who continued to express dissent, however, did so not just in printed works and pamphlets, but also in metal.

    Whether for collectors or for commercial use, the possibilities of a freely-circulating medium, almost impossible to police, were obvious to those who wished to spread propaganda against the state, and although the manufacturers and engravers of tokens would happily take commissions from such parties, the issuers could if necessary acquire the necessary machinery to manufacture them alone. Associations of dissenters who felt themselves particular notable, therefore, or those who wished to celebrate one of the few triumphs against the status quo, often had recourse to this form of advertising in copper.

    The danger and isolation of dissent led to a grimly humourous camaraderie that makes these tokens witty, but often hard to grasp. This coin or token, for example, mimics the commercial issues that invited the buying public to redeem their tokens for silver at the issuer's business address ("Payable at the residence of..."), but the 'address' given by the reverse design is Newgate Gaol, because the four men named had been imprisoned there for sedition the previous year.

    The joke hangs on the assumption that the prisoners' names would have been known to anyone who happened to receive the token. This is evidence in itself that the doings of revolutionaries were the subject of common report in London.

    Source: The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England; Tokens of Revolution
    Occupation From 1804 to 1829  Nailsworth, Gloucestershire, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Baptist Minister 
    Address :  
    Shortwood Tabernacle 
    Died 31 Mar 1829  Shortwood, Gloucestershire, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Apr 1829  Stroud, Gloucestershire, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Address :  
    Stroud Cemetery 
    Siblings 6 siblings 
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Photos
    WINTERBOTHAM, William (1763-1829)
    WINTERBOTHAM, William (1763-1829)
    This portrait of William was painted in 1828, just a year before his death.
    Documents
    John Brend and William Winterbotham: Partnership Dissolved
    John Brend and William Winterbotham: Partnership Dissolved
    This article appeared in the London Gazette on 9 June 1804. It is a formal announcement that the partnership between John and William, Drapers, of Plymouth, was dissolved on 1 May 1804.
    Notes 
    • Baptism registers at St Mary Whitechapel suggest that William and his family lived previously in Mansel Street, off Rosemary Lane, maybe still scraping together the capital for their shop. Mrs Winterbotham took on the fostering of the (presumably illegitimate) child of a merchant, and William was sent to his grandparents in Cheltenham.

      He did not return until the age of ten, when, accompanied by a maiden aunt, he was set down at the 'Bolt and Tun' in Fleet Street amid the "noise novelty and confusion" of a London Saturday evening. He "found it very tedious to await the customary hour of a London Sunday morning" to meet his parents properly. As he settled in, he loved to watch the ships on the Thames and imagine the different continents of the world.

      William's experiences at school might resonate with any era. He was ribbed for his country accent, and the teachers assumed (wrongly) that he could not have been taught to London standards. After a caning for a misdemeanour he had not committed, William refused to go back to school. His exasperated parents tried everything, including grounding him and giving him irksome chores. He found a way out through apprenticeship to a Silversmith, William Harrison of Monkwell Street.

      It is hard to know how typical William's experience was; this was long after the heyday of London apprenticeship, but it does seem an informal affair. He appealed to a friend of his father's who was seeking an apprentice, and his parents eventually consented, with no fee being paid. He therefore had to carry out some menial tasks, such as cleaning shoes and knives, sweeping the shop and making his own bed! Having been taken on at the age of 13, below the City's statutory age (14) for indenture, his master agreed that he should be paid for his work in the last year of his seven year term, or be at liberty to go elsewhere. William was a keen negotiator. At only 14, he claims, he learned that a master might expect the work of an apprentice to bring in 15/- a week, and asked successfully to be paid for any work he accomplished beyond this value.

      As a journeyman, Winterbotham writes that he was drawn into a dissolute life (the details of which are, alas, no longer extant), resulting in illness and a long spell being nursed back at home by his long suffering parents. He was subsequently in and out of work, with the silver trade suffering in the mid 1780s. He appears to have joined in the Gordon Riots.

      Out of sceptical curiosity he attended a non-conformist service in Pennington Street and shortly afterwards joined the congregation. In 1789 he was baptised by Mr Fleming in the river at Old Ford. Although still suffering mental illness, he became a successful preacher, and left this second phase of London life to act as Assistant Baptist Minister in Plymouth.

      Taken from an article for "London Lives" written by Melanie Winterbotham, a descendant and historian.
    Person ID I14071  Winterbotham Families
    Last Modified 2 Apr 2012 

    Father John Winterbotham (ID:I14076)
              b. 1720, Oldham, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 1797, Islington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77) 
    Mother Elizabeth Hyett (ID:I14077)
              b. 1730, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. Sep 1792, City of London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 62) 
    Married 19 Oct 1760  St Mary at Hill, London, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 7 children 
    Family ID F3556  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mary Brend (ID:I14075)
              b. 1768, Devonport (Plymouth), Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location
              d. 25 Aug 1833, Plymouth, Devonshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65) 
    Married 26 Nov 1797  Holborn, London, EnglandFind all individuals with events at this location 
    Address :  
    St Sepulchre's Church 
    • The marriage was conducted by the Chaplain of Newgate on the day of William's release from Newgate prison. The church stood directly opposite the prison which was finally demolished in 1902 to make way for the Central Criminal Court.
    Marriage Record: WINTERBOTAHM, William and BREND, Mary 17971126
    Marriage Record: WINTERBOTAHM, William and BREND, Mary 17971126
    Children 6 children 
    Last Modified 17 Jan 2011 09:53:36 
    Family ID F3555  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsBorn - Address :  
    Mansfield Street off Rosemary Lane, Little Minories - 15 Dec 1763 - Aldgate, London, England
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    Link to Google MapsChristened - Address :  
    St Mary - 25 Dec 1763 - Whitechapel, London, England
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    Link to Google MapsCriminal Charges - Address :  
    Exeter Assizes - 26 Jul 1793 - Exeter, Devonshire, England
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    Link to Google MapsMarried - Address :  
    St Sepulchre's Church - 26 Nov 1797 - Holborn, London, England
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    Link to Google MapsOccupation - Baptist Minister - From 1804 to 1829 - Nailsworth, Gloucestershire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 31 Mar 1829 - Shortwood, Gloucestershire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Address :  
    Stroud Cemetery - Apr 1829 - Stroud, Gloucestershire, England
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     = Link to Google Earth 
    Pin Legend  : Exact Location       : Area, Suburb, Parish or Registration District       : City, Town or Village       : County or Shire       : State or Province       : Country or Continent       : Site of (No longer exists)       : Not Defined

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